Hadrian's Wall, Northern England Photos

Hadrian's Wall (begun 122AD) ran across the top of England at a narrow point from the Irish Sea to the North Sea as a defensive fortification by ancient Rome under the reign of Emperor Hadrian. It objective was to keep raiding Scottish Picts from disrupting Roman Britannia. The stone wall included small castle & turrets every mile plus larger forts with garrisoned towns every five Roman Miles. Significant ruins still exist as well as a walking path sea to sea for the full 117.5 km of the ancient structure. In 142AD, the Romans tried to extend their area of control into Scotland itself with a second defensive wall running across a narrow point from north of Glasgow to the Firth of Forth. Not much of the second Antonine Wall remains. Both walls are evidence of the strength of Picts.

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Hadrian's Wall, built by Romans to secure northern boundary of Britannia, runs with a walking path from Irish to North Sea entirely within England. Scotland.Hadrian's Wall ruins of small square Roman fort which were inserted about every Roman mile along wall's 117.5 km length. Scotland.Cows graze along stone ruins of Hadrian's Wall. Scotland.Hadrian's Wall dwarfed along top of rocky escarpment defended Roman Britannia from Pictish Scots. Scotland.
Hadrian's Wall, built (122AD) by Romans to secure northern boundary of Britannia, runs with a walking path from Irish to North Sea entirely within England. Scotland.Hadrian's Wall ruins of small square Roman fort which were inserted about every Roman mile along wall's 117.5 km length. Scotland.Cows graze along stone ruins of Hadrian's Wall. Scotland.Hadrian's Wall dwarfed along top of rocky escarpment defended Roman Britannia from Pictish Scots. Scotland.
Hadrian's Wall with small fort follow highest defensive path across England. Scotland.


Hadrian's Wall with small fort follow highest defensive path across England. Scotland.



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All photos on this page are originals by & copyrighted by Jim Steinhart.
All rights reserved. Permission required to use.