Monteiths & Rinsers Photos

Up to the 18th Century wine glasses were expensive & sometimes even broken after use for show. Thus, many hosts only offered only one wineglass per person, no matter how many different wines were served. Bowls called rinsers or Monteiths became a table setting item so guests could rinse or store such glasses. Since the glasses were rinsed or stored stem end up, Monteiths evolved a series of indentations around the rim to support stems, a feature that helps identify these metal, ceramic or glass objects.

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Silver monteith by John Coney of Boston at Yale University Art Gallery. New Haven, CT.Silver monteith from London, England at Art Institute of Chicago. Chicago, IL.Dining room table with Chinese Cantonware plates & wine rinsers to clean wine glasses between courses at Morris-Jumel Mansion. New York, NY.English glass wineglass & rinser at Corning Museum of Glass. Corning, NY.
Silver monteith (notched bowl for rinsing wine glasses) (c1705) by John Coney of Boston at Yale University Art Gallery. New Haven, CT.Silver monteith (1685-6) from London, England at Art Institute of Chicago. Chicago, IL.Dining room table with Chinese Cantonware plates & wine rinsers to clean wine glasses between courses at Morris-Jumel Mansion. New York, NY.English glass wineglass (1720-30) & rinser (c1800) at Corning Museum of Glass. Corning, NY.
English rinser & stirrup glass to hand wine to person on horseback at Corning Museum of Glass. Corning, NY.


English rinser & stirrup glass to hand wine to person on horseback (c1810) at Corning Museum of Glass. Corning, NY.



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All photos on this page are originals by & copyrighted by Jim Steinhart.
All rights reserved. Permission required to use.